Gen Olson’s story

In 2008, after double knee replacement surgery and a stay at a rehabilitation center, a blood clot, irregular heartbeat, low oxygen level and a swift ambulance ride to Ridgeview Medical Center’s emergency room weren’t on her agenda.

In 2008, after double knee replacement surgery and a stay at a rehabilitation center, a blood clot, irregular heartbeat, low oxygen level and a swift ambulance ride to Ridgeview Medical Center’s emergency room weren’t on her agenda.

Although a little bit dismayed, Olson never questioned she was in the best hands. She raved about the expertise she saw and the kindness of care. “Patients are treated with personal attention and kindness that shows,” Olson said.

Olson said she’s grateful for the outcome, but claims the defining moment was being immediately recognized and personally greeted by name when paramedics whizzed her into the emergency room. That, she explained, “was a heart-warming surprise that meant the world—something one doesn’t expect these days.”

With a smile on her face and a quiver in her voice Olson said, “Knowing you have a place to go that can respond when you need it at the level you need is critical. Ridgeview saved my life—more than once!”

In 2011, an increased heartbeat brought Olson back to Ridgeview’s Emergency Department. After lab work, providers soon learned her hemoglobin counts were dropping and scans showed she had an enlarged spleen. Though thankful to keep her heart, she chuckled, physicians explained her spleen needed to go.

“Ridgeview has served my family as long as I can remember,” Olson said. She recalled the quality of care her parents received.

With a smile, she reminisced about the time she had the same nurse in 2011 that once cared for her dad in 1990.

“The staff, their warmth, commitment and extensive length of service says a lot about Ridgeview’s culture,” Olson said. “Their mission and intent shows—the reason my parents and I have been coming to Ridgeview for decades.”

Olson is no stranger to how to move an agenda forward and make communities better. She served four years in local and 30 years in state elective office, and in 1998 was the endorsed candidate for Lieutenant governor.

Bottom line, she knows how to get things done by working together to reach a common goal. Ridgeview recognized that and in the early 1980s recruited her to serve on the Foundation Board—a position she held for 20 years. She said she witnessed first-hand how donations from generous individuals helped

Ridgeview advance its medical excellence and continue to do so with an amazing level of community support and commitment.

“Ridgeview’s vision to improve the Emergency Department is worthy of everyone’s support,”

Olson said. Since it’s been 25 years since the last upgrade, she said being sensitive to people’s needs and providing staff the working environment and technology Ridgeview needs to create successful outcomes is key.

“People need to realize how blessed they are to have Ridgeview in their backyard. I’m living proof of what urgent situations and positive experiences look like,” she smiled.

“Ridgeview’s vision to improve the Emergency Department is worthy of everyone’s support”