Food label IQ

How much do you know about food labels? Take the quiz!

1. True or False: Ingredients on a food label are listed in order of most to least healthy.


2. True or False: There are 13 core nutrients listed in the Nutrition Facts Table.


3. True or False: When an item is labeled as a “Source of Fiber,” it must contain at least 4 grams of dietary fiber.


4. True or False: Vitamin D is not a core nutrient listed in the Nutrition Facts Table.


5. True or False: A product that says “fat free” has no fat and is a perfect food for someone trying to lose weight.


6. True or False: When trying to figure out how many calories of protein or carbohydrates are in a food, you would multiply the number of grams of each by 6.


7. True or False: The information found on a package’s food label refers to the entire package.


8. True or False: Items labeled “Cholesterol-free” are also low in saturated fat and trans fat.


9. True or False: As defined by the government, the calorie-free label includes items that are 10 calories or fewer per serving.


10. True or False: If an item is labeled as “extra lean,” this means that the product has less than 5 grams of fat, 2 grams of saturated fat and 95 milligrams of cholesterol per serving.

Food Label IQ Answers

Here are the answers to the Food Label IQ questions.

1. False. The ingredients are listed in order of weight, from the heaviest to the lightest, with the first three items often making up the majority of that particular food item.

2. True. There are 13 core nutrients listed in the Nutrition Facts Table, and they always appear in the following order: fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrate, fiber, sugars, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and iron.

3. False. Items claiming to be a “Source of Fiber” can only be labeled as such if they contain at least 2 grams of dietary fiber in the amount of food specified in the Nutrition Facts Table.

4. True. Calcium, sodium and vitamin A are part of the core nutrients that are always listed in the Nutrition Facts Table, while vitamin D is not.

5. False. First of all, foods are allowed to claim that they are fat-free if they contain 0.5 mgs of fat or less. When it comes to trans fat, this is a new game food companies are playing. Why is this important? Because if you do eat a fair number of so-called fat-free products, and they actually contain 0.5 grams of trans fat, then you could be eating several grams of trans fat daily. This is the dangerous artery-clogging fat that health experts have been sounding the alarm about. So as a detective, you need to look in the actual ingredients part of the label to see if names of trans fat are listed. Second, experts now know that including healthy fats in your diet is important for satiety and for health benefits.

6. False. When trying to figure out how many calories of protein or carbohydrates are in a food, you would multiply the number of grams of each by 4.

7. False. The information found on a package’s food label refers to recommended serving.

8. True. An item stating to be “cholesterol-free” means that the product has less than 2 milligrams of cholesterol in the amount of food specified in the Nutrition Facts Table. It is also low in saturated fat and trans fat.

9. False. In order to be labeled “calorie-free,” the item must include 5 calories or fewer per serving.

10. True. “Extra lean” refers to products less than 5 grams of fat, 2 grams of saturated fat and 95 milligrams of cholesterol per serving. “Lean” refers to products less than 10 grams of fat, 4 grams of saturated fat and 95 milligrams of cholesterol per serving.

Sources: Infoplease.com, Howtobefit.com & Healthandpills.com